About Myanmar

Mingalabar is a word of welcome and a wish for good fortune. This single word signifies the inherent nature of the people of Myanmar, offering world-class hospitality and always wishing others well. Traditions deeply rooted in the loving-kindness philosophy of Buddhism, the creed the Myanmar lives by is cedana, or heart-felt goodwill towards friends and strangers alike.

Learn more about the elements of Myanmar that make it exceptional.

Culture & Religion
Culture & Religion

85% of Myanmar’s population practices Buddhism, but there are substantial numbers of Christians, Hindus, Muslims and animists throughout the country. It is therefore not unusual to see pagodas, churches, mosques and temples standing together in a single neighborhood. Spirit worship also exists side-by-side with Buddhism, as these minor gods are believed to be disciples of the Buddha’s teachings. In a long-standing religious tradition, Myanmar’s Buddhist families celebrate their sons’ novice initiation into the Buddhist Order, and the...

Language
Language

There are more than 100 ethnic groups in Myanmar, all with their own languages and dialects. The majority speaks Myanmar (Burmese), although English is widely spoken in urban areas and tourist hubs like Yangon and Mandalay. Helpful tour guides that speak major foreign languages can be booked through your tour operator.

Geography, Population & Climate
Geography, Population & Climate

Myanmar is geographically the largest country in Southeast Asia. Rich not only in traditions, Myanmar’s fertile land is crossed by a number of rivers that are used for transportation, irrigation, and also as a source of food. Myanmar’s primary river artery is the Irrawaddy, often referred to here as the Ayerawady. Mines have yielded some of the world’s finest rubies and imperial jades, while the sea off the southern coast is prime breeding ground for cultured pearls of excellent luster. The country’s natural resources include a stunnin...

History
History

Myanmar’s history can be traced back to the 2nd century when the Rakhine ruled the west coast and Pyu civilization flourished in the central regions. Throughout the years great kingdoms came and went until the Third Myanmar Empire fell in 1885 to the colonial British; Myanmar subsequently regained independence in 1948. For many years Myanmar disappeared behind a wall of self-isolation, and only recently reopened its doors to the outside world, revealing the country’s unique culture and stunning scenery to new generations of visitors.

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